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How to make a flaky whole wheat pie crust, step by step

Deep dish apple pie in whole wheat pastry shell
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Deep dish apple pie in whole wheat pastry shell

Practice, practice, practice!

Remember the old adage, "How do you get to Carnegie Hall?" The answer: "Practice, practice, practice," holds just as true for making good whole wheat pie crusts.

The more pies and pastries you make, the more your hands, eyes, and in my opinion, heart understand the living thing that is whole grain flour.

Just as practice helps a toddler learn to walk, then to run, so practice helps the baker learn when the flour is too wet or too dry, when it requires a little more kneading, and when it is time to stop and roll out the dough.

If you are just learning to use whole wheat in pastries, you may find it a little daunting. I'm here to prove to you that a delectable, tender whole wheat crust is within your reach.

As a young bride, when I first started making whole wheat crusts, they came out tough and heavy. I was so discouraged, in fact, that I stopped making pies altogether.

Years later, my expert pie-making mother-in-law was gone, and I lived nowhere near my mom, who can throw a white-flour pie crust together in minutes.

With no one to bake the pies we loved for holidays and special occasions, I decided I had better learn how to get the flaky, tender pastry I craved.

Experimenting time and again, I tried dozens of "no-fail" recipes, tweaking and changing them every step of the way.




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Banana cream pie in whole wheat pie crust
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Banana cream pie in whole wheat pie crust
Source: Author

A whole wheat recipe we love

At last! All those more--and less--successful attempts paid off and I had a recipe I could rely on. You can get my recipe here: Tender, Flaky Delicious Whole Wheat Pie Crust.

This page is a companion to that one. While the recipe is highly important to the outcome, this page is about the equally important techniques.

Whether you are an inexperienced baker as determined as I was to learn to make a healthier, whole wheat pastry shell, or you are more experienced but leery of getting a whole wheat pie crust you like as much as your white flour version, this page is for you.

Think of it as Whole Wheat Pie Crust 101.

See all 24 photos

Easy? Yes, if you are patient and understand a few things about whole wheat

There is nothing difficult about any of these steps. Each is easy to do. But because of the nature of whole wheat, getting a consistently good pie crust depends a bit on practice--getting a feel for the dough.

Unlike highly processed white flour, which has additives to make it behave just the same every time, whole wheat is unrefined. That means it is far less predictable, a changeable thing.

Subject to temperature, humidity and a host of factors beyond our control--from growing to harvesting to milling--the route to making good pie crust every time is dependent on the knowledge that comes only from working with flour again and again and again.

Through experience, you will begin to feel whether the dough is too wet or too dry, when it needs a little more liquid and when not, when it is ready to roll, and when it needs a little more working, or a good chill.

Be patient, and if you can, find ways to make it fun. Working with flour is often rhythmic, like a dance.

Step-by-step in pictures

On this page, I show you, step by step, the techniques I've learned to obtain a flaky whole grain crust.

Because the right tools are so important to the success of any endeavor, we start with a check-list of the tools the beginner baker will need to make a pie crust with ease.

Tools check-list

Check
Item
 
1-2 qt. lidded, stainless steel bowl
 
Stainless steel pastry cutter
 
Stainless steel chopper/dough scraper
 
Unbleached, compostable baking parchment
 
Fine mesh strainer
 
French rolling pin
 
9-inch pie plate
 
Pie weights
 
9-inch pie crust shield

Tools you will need

Very likely you already have most of these tools, but if you are new to baking pies, you may need a few more. Most of these tools will serve you a lifetime. Many of mine are decades old.

Don't feel you have to rush out and buy these brand new. Quite often, longtime cooks have extra tools in their kitchen and would be happy to lend or gift spares just to get them out of their hair. Cooks love to share!

You may also find free baking supplies on Freecycle.org, or look for inexpensive supplies in your local thrift stores.

Immediately below, you will see examples of the tools I recommend, along with the reasons why.

A 1-2 quart lidded, stainless steel bowl

I am especially fond of these deep, lidded stainless steel bowls because they are easy to hold, have a silicone non-slip grip on the bottom, and lids, so I can mix and store in one bowl.


MIU France Set of 3 Stainless Steel Mixing Bowls with Lids, Silver/Red
MIU France Set of 3 Stainless Steel Mixing Bowls with Lids, Silver/Red

The middle bowl in this set is just right for making crust, because it is deep enough that flour doesn't fly out when sifting and whisking the dry ingredients.

 

Stainless steel pastry cutter

It may be a small thing, but this stainless steel pastry cutter has saved me hours of time and tons of elbow grease over the years.

Cutting butter into pastry with this tool is far easier and less time consuming than either the wire pastry cutter I used to use or the two knives I learned to use in Home Economics back in junior high.

Winco 5 Blade Pastry Blender, Stainless Steel
Winco 5 Blade Pastry Blender, Stainless Steel

The tines are fairly heavy-duty and sharp. The handle is comfortably cool and rounded, so it fits the hand easily without tiring somewhat arthritic hands such as mine.

 

Stainless steel chopper/dough scraper

This is one of the most useful tools a cook can have. You will need it for pastry making, and if you're like me, you will find yourself using it every time you cook.

Stainless Steel Scraper/Chopper
Stainless Steel Scraper/Chopper

Made of food-grade stainless steel, this blade is as elegant in its simplicity as it is inexpensive.

 

Unbleached, compostable baking parchment

Another of those supplies that make my work in the kitchen a pleasure, this Earth-friendly baking parchment comes in handy in dozens of ways.

You will need it more than once in your pastry-making process, but you can reuse the same sheet throughout.

If You Care FSC Certified Parchment Baking Paper, 70 sq ft
If You Care FSC Certified Parchment Baking Paper, 70 sq ft

Unlike some baking parchments, this brand is certified compostable, so you know it will biodegrade and go back to the Earth.

 

Fine mesh strainer

The fine mesh comes in handy when dusting your work surface and dough lightly with flour. You don't want to over-dust and dry out your dough with too much flour. A sieve like this lays just enough to prevent sticking.

Alternatively, an old-fashioned, fine-mesh tea strainer would do the job just as well.

Cuisinart CTG-00-3MS Mesh Strainers, Set of 3
Cuisinart CTG-00-3MS Mesh Strainers, Set of 3

Again, food-grade stainless steel makes these strainers safe for food preparation.

 

French rolling pin

According to America's Test Kitchen (ATK), an inexpensive French rolling pin is the best one for rolling pies. I own three rolling pins, and I agree with ATK. This one works best for rolling pie crust. Besides, who am I to argue with the French when it comes to pastry making?

Fletchers' Mill French Rolling Pin, 20-Inch, Maple
Fletchers' Mill French Rolling Pin, 20-Inch, Maple

Especially good news: This pin is made by a family-owned company right here in the United States. More importantly, it is manufactured of wood from sustainable forests.

 

A nine-inch pie plate

But of course, you will need a nine-inch pie plate to bake your pie! I've had most of my Pyrex pie pans, well, since the Seventies! They're built to last.

Pyrex Easy Grab 9.5-Inch Pie Plate, 2-Pack
Pyrex Easy Grab 9.5-Inch Pie Plate, 2-Pack

Pyrex is also made in the United States, so another win.

 

Pie weights

Many recipes, such as quiches and pumpkin pies, call for pre-baked crusts. When you pre-bake a crust, you need pie weights to keep it from bubbling up.

These are ceramic, but a couple of pounds of inexpensive garbanzo or soy beans, from the bulk section of your local grocer, work just as well.

Mrs. Anderson's Baking Ceramic Pie Weights
Mrs. Anderson's Baking Ceramic Pie Weights

One nice thing about these weights: Their packaging container becomes their storage container. No waste!

 

9-inch Pie Crust Shield

If you've ever tried to crimp foil around a pie crust without crushing the pastry, you will understand why this shield is so valuable. It keeps the crust from scorching and toughening, so that every bite of your crust is tender enough to enjoy to the last crumb.

Non-Stick Pie Crust Shield
Non-Stick Pie Crust Shield

This shield fits both a 9" and a 10" pie, so you need only one.

 

A sturdy wire cooling rack

I love these racks because they provide a firm surface beneath my pie pans, yet have plenty of room for air flow. They are especially nice when baking cookies, because you don't have to worry about the cookies falling between the tines, as you do with the old-fashioned style racks.

Chicago Metallic Non-Stick Extra Large Cooling Rack, 16.7 by 11-1/2-Inch
Chicago Metallic Non-Stick Extra Large Cooling Rack, 16.7 by 11-1/2-Inch

This extra large size holds two pie plates, two cake pans, and lots of cookies.

 

One last thing: Take time to enjoy the process

Joy in dough? It is true. Working with dough makes me happy, and you may find it does the same for you.

One of the joys of baking is the feeling that enters my fingertips and flows all the way up to my heart and mind. It is a feeling, an understanding that the wheat and the dough is, well, alive is the only way I know to express it. This is something I never felt working with white flour.

The pleasure of baking is as much in working with the dough as it is in seeing, tasting and sharing wholesome, mouth-watering pies and quiches.

All right. Enough with the preliminaries. Let's get to work.

Whole Wheat Pie Crust 101

Ready? Whether you are using mine or another recipe, get your ingredients together. For a flaky crust, you will need butter for the fat. Oil makes a tough crust, and butter is far healthier for us than hydrogenated shortening or margarine, according to the Weston A. Price Foundation in an article on Mercola.com.

According to your recipe, whisk together your dry ingredients with a fork or wire whisk
See all 24 photos
According to your recipe, whisk together your dry ingredients with a fork or wire whisk
Source: Author

Instructions


1. Using a fork or wire whisk, combine the dry ingredients.

Whisking them aerates the flour, which helps to obtain that lighter, flakier texture we're looking for.



Cut the butter until the largest pieces are about the size of peas
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Cut the butter until the largest pieces are about the size of peas
Source: Author

2. You will need room-temperature butter.* If you're starting with cold, hard butter, see Quick Way to Soften Butter.

Then, using a rolling motion with your pastry cutter, and turning the bowl as you work, cut the butter into the dry ingredients until the largest pieces are about the size of a small pea. The mixture will resemble a lumpy cornmeal in texture.

Place the flour and butter mixture bowl in your refrigerator, along with your chopper/dough scraper, and chill for 30 minutes.

*My gratitude to Maria Rodale of Maria's Farm Country Kitchen for sharing her bakery friend Haika's secret to extra flaky pastry: Starting with room temperature butter rather than chilled. It works!

Toss the mixture with a fork after adding each additional tablespoon of moisture, until the mixture holds together when you squeeze it gently in your hand
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Toss the mixture with a fork after adding each additional tablespoon of moisture, until the mixture holds together when you squeeze it gently in your hand
Source: Author

3. Leaving the chopper/dough scraper in the fridge for now, bring the flour mixture out and add moisture one tablespoon at a time, tossing with a fork until the mixture is just moist enough to hold together when you squeeze a bit in your hand.

Dump the moistened dough onto the parchment-clad board
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Dump the moistened dough onto the parchment-clad board
Source: Author

4. Cut a piece of parchment paper large enough to roll out a 9" pie crust comfortably.

Using a mesh sieve, dust the paper lightly with flour, and turn the mixture onto the parchment paper.

Using your chilled dough scraper, work the dough into a lump
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Using your chilled dough scraper, work the dough into a lump
Source: Author

5. Using your chilled bench knife, quickly and gently work the dough into a lump, turning it against the parchment-covered board again and again. Touch it with your hands as little as possible.

Shape the dough quickly into a disk
See all 24 photos
Shape the dough quickly into a disk
Source: Author

6. Continue working the dough until it resembles a roundish disk. This part of the process should take no more than a minute or two.

Once you have a rough disk shape, turn it quickly on the edge, rolling it into a disk about 1-1/2 inches thick
See all 24 photos
Once you have a rough disk shape, turn it quickly on the edge, rolling it into a disk about 1-1/2 inches thick
Source: Author

7. Dust your fingers lightly with flour and pick up the rounded lump. Hold it between your thumb and forefinger and roll on the board to smooth the edges. I don't know why it works, but this helps give you a nice even circle when you roll it out.

Until I learned this trick, I used to have torn edges that cut deep into the circle. I always had to paste the bits together in the pie plate. Not any more!

See all the bits of cold butter in the dough? That's good. You don't want those to melt under your hand.
See all 24 photos
See all the bits of cold butter in the dough? That's good. You don't want those to melt under your hand.
Source: Author

8. Roll the disk until the dough is well integrated. This one is nearly there. It still has a few cracks showing, that would result in tears when you roll out the crust.

Keep rolling the disk around the parchment paper till these are gone, but not so long that your hands warm up the dough. Be careful not to press the dough. let the smoothness of the board do the work.

Wrap the parchment around your disk and tuck it in the refrigerator for 30 minutes, up to 24 hours
See all 24 photos
Wrap the parchment around your disk and tuck it in the refrigerator for 30 minutes, up to 24 hours
Source: Author

9. When your disk is mostly round and about 3/4-1 inch in height, pull the parchment paper around it, tuck the ends in so they don't come loose, and refrigerate for 30 minutes or overnight.

I find 30 minutes is just right to chill the dough without making it too cold to roll out quickly. Some say that refrigerating overnight helps the wheat to absorb the moisture and become more tender, but I have not noticed a difference in the outcome, and the dough is much more difficult to roll when it is that cold.

When you're ready to roll out your door, open the disk up on the parchment paper and dust both parchment and disk with a bit of flour
See all 24 photos
When you're ready to roll out your door, open the disk up on the parchment paper and dust both parchment and disk with a bit of flour
Source: Author

10. Open the parchment paper and very lightly dust both parchment paper and dough with flour.

Carefully roll out the dough, working from the center outward, and turning one-quarter around after each roll
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Carefully roll out the dough, working from the center outward, and turning one-quarter around after each roll
Source: Author

11. Lay your rolling pin on the center of the disk and roll away from you. Turn the parchment paper a quarter turn, lay the pin again in the center of the disk and roll away from you. Continue turning and rolling.

At first, it may seem as though the dough is not beginning to stretch and flatten, but keep going. Soon the circle will begin to shrink in height and expand in circumference.

The goal here is to work gently enough that the flour and butter are not separated, but remain fused, for it is in their fusion that you get the little flaky layers that make pastry so tender and delightful on the tongue.

Periodically flip the dough over; dust lightly with more flour if needed to prevent sticking
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Periodically flip the dough over; dust lightly with more flour if needed to prevent sticking
Source: Author

12. From time to time, flip the disk over. This helps to keep the pastry from sticking to the parchment. If necessary dust very lightly with flour.

The objective here is to keep the pastry from sticking to pin or surface, but not to add so much flour that the dough becomes dry.

Your circle should be about 2 inches larger in circumference than your pie plate
See all 24 photos
Your circle should be about 2 inches larger in circumference than your pie plate
Source: Author

13. Roll the dough to about two inches larger than the widest diameter of your pie plate or quiche pan. You need enough to fill the sides with an overhang for turning under to form the crimped edge.

Leaving the parchment behind, roll the dough up onto the rolling pin and quickly roll back over your pie plate
See all 24 photos
Leaving the parchment behind, roll the dough up onto the rolling pin and quickly roll back over your pie plate
Source: Author

14. Carefully roll the dough away from the parchment and onto your rolling pin.

Now, I realize I discussed using a 9-inch Pyrex pie plate in the shopping list. On this day, I happened to be making a quiche in my fluted quiche pan. My, my. Such inconsistencies.

Gently press the dough into the pie plate
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Gently press the dough into the pie plate
Source: Author

15. Lift the rolled dough quickly over the pie plate, center it and unroll. Gently help the pastry to settle into the contours of the dish.

Trim all the way round, leaving about half an inch hanging over the edge
See all 24 photos
Trim all the way round, leaving about half an inch hanging over the edge
Source: Author

16. Trim the edges with your kitchen shears, leaving about a half inch overhang.

Turn the edge under
See all 24 photos
Turn the edge under
Source: Author

17. Working quickly, turn the edge under all the way round.

Flute the edges if using a plain pie plate, or press lightly into the scalloped edges of a quiche pan
See all 24 photos
Flute the edges if using a plain pie plate, or press lightly into the scalloped edges of a quiche pan
Source: Author

18. Crimp or flute the edge. For a quiche like this, I simply help the dough to conform to the quiche plate. For a pie plate, I make a scalloped edge by gently pushing the dough with two fingers against the broad side of my thumb.

Prick the bottom of the pie shell lightly with a fork here and there. This helps prevent bubbles lifting the crust while baking.

If you are making a fruit pie, fill and top as usual. If you are making a quiche or cream pie, and need a pre-baked crust, continue with the following steps.

For a pre-baked pie shell

Continue as follows.

For a pre-baked shell, lay a clean piece of parchment on the prepared shell, leaving enough edges to pick up and carry the pie weights after baking; fill will pie weights or dried beans
See all 24 photos
For a pre-baked shell, lay a clean piece of parchment on the prepared shell, leaving enough edges to pick up and carry the pie weights after baking; fill will pie weights or dried beans
Source: Author

1. Preheat the oven to 450F.

Line the unbaked crust with a piece of clean parchment paper with plenty of overhang. You need enough to draw the parchment together after baking, so you can lift the beans from the plate.

You can use the parchment paper in which you wrapped and rolled the dough. Just dust any bits of dough off before you place it in the pan. You also want to make sure you have enough parchment that you can lift it, beans and all, from the pan later.

Fill the plate completely with pie beads or use dried beans you save just for this purpose. I have a stash in a large Fido jar that is enough to fill even my biggest pie plate.

Cool completely before removing the pie weights
See all 24 photos
Cool completely before removing the pie weights
Source: Author

2. Check your oven temperature with an oven thermometer to assure proper baking, and bake at 450°F for 8-9 minutes, until crust is set and just beginning to brown.

Remove from oven and cool on a wire rack completely before lifting beans or beads from the shell.

Broccoli red-pepper quiche in whole wheat pie shell
See all 24 photos
Broccoli red-pepper quiche in whole wheat pie shell
Source: Author

3. When you're ready to add the filling, fill the shell and bake according to your recipe.

Cover the rim of the plate and crust edge with a shield. Remove shield for last ten minutes of baking to permit edge to brown.

© 2013 Kathryn Grace Last updated on September 7, 2014

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Please share your comments, thoughts and questions. 87 comments

ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 2 weeks ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@Besarien, pie weights are indeed nice to have. I bought a package once. They didn't fill the pie even half way, so I added them to the beans I've been using for thirty some years. Thank goodness we can reuse those beans! I could not countenance throwing them out each time.

My mom didn't use measuring cups either. I think our mothers--and theirs--made a whole lot more pies than we do today. Their very bones knew what the dough needed. The more pies I make, the more my hands begin to take over and know exactly how much handling the dough requires, whether to add a little more moisture.

I'm here, if ever you have any questions about your pie making. Perhaps we can figure out the answers together.


Besarien profile image

Besarien 2 weeks ago Level 3 Commenter

Great hub! My son has no sweet tooth and worries about carbs. He also thinks gluten is the devil. Trying to convince him that baking is a great skill to have, even if you are 14 and think you never will need it. My pie crusts are pretty hit and miss honestly. I try for consistency and am not sure where I sometimes go wrong. I try to handle it so little that I'm halfway convinced that I don't handle it enough. My mother on the other hand never measured anything in her life ( she didn't even own a measuring cup ) and always made great pies. Once again, looks like I got my dad's genes or maybe I was secretly adopted. That quiche looks so good that I want to eat the photo. Also are pie weights not the greatest invention ever? I can't even imagine how many perfectly good beans have been thrown away.


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jmchaconne 9 months ago Level 3 Commenter

Wow yum!!!


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@norma-holt: I understand. Baking requires a certain mindset, in my view, one I did not entertain for many years. Thank you for taking a look.


norma-holt profile image

norma-holt 10 months ago Level 4 Commenter

Great recipes. I am with you on wholewheat flour. Unfortunately I am off pies as I don't use my oven now. If it won't cook in the MW I don't bother - it's an age and lazy thing. Well done.


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@Adamthomsons: Thank you, Adam.


Adamthomsons 10 months ago

This is a great way to make it


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@TreasuresBrenda: Thank you for stopping by, Brenda, and a happy New Year to you.


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ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@Mr-Squidoo-Review: Thank you, so kind of you to say so.


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ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@DebMartin: You're welcome Deb. If you have any questions, any at all, please contact me.


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ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@ZaraColly: We certainly enjoy it. Thanks for the visit and welcome to Squidoo.


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ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@delia-delia: Thank you, and you are welcome.


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@captainj88: Thank you so much, and a very happy new year to you.


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@anonymous: Thank you for your kindly comment. Best wishes for a good year in 2014.


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@seahorse60: You're welcome, and that is wonderful news! Do let me know how it goes and if you have any questions along the way.


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ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@Mickie Gee: You're welcome! When it's just for us and I need to shave a few minutes off the total time, I use the food processor, but I get flakier pastry when I use the hand-held pastry blender. Thank you for stopping by. I'm here to answer any questions you might have along the way.


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ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@esmonaco: Always delighted to find another fan of whole wheat. Let me know how it turns out.


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ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@Zeraton: Thank you.


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@Lee Hansen: Thank you Pastiche. I appreciate your encouragement. I find the stainless steel pastry cutter I recommend above much easier and quicker to use than the wire-tined version I had for many years. It's easier to use because it is sharper and the butter does not glob on it as badly as it does on the wire type. Do contact me if you have any questions about making whole wheat pies. I'm happy to help.


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ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@sybil watson: Thank you on all counts, and a blessed new year to you.


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@Sable: Thank you. Yes, there is a bit of a learning curve with whole wheat flour, but after awhile, you get a "feel" for it and know right away whether the dough needs a little more moisture or a little more flour. Thank you for taking the time to visit. Deeply appreciated.


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@Art Inspired: Thank you so much and you are welcome. It truly was an amazing day. Happy New Year!


TreasuresBrenda profile image

TreasuresBrenda 10 months ago from Canada Level 4 Commenter

Fabulous instructions! I don't make many pies but when I do, I need to incorporate some whole wheat flour.


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@blessedmomto7: Ah! Then your family already enjoys the goodness of whole wheat, so you won't have that hurdle to hop. I suspect you will like whole wheat pies too, but do let me know, if you can. I'd love to hear.


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@Susan Zutautas: Thank you, Susan. Do let me know if you have any questions along the way. I hope I've taken out the intimidation factor.


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ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@Merrci: Thank you, Merrci. I appreciate your coming back. Wishing you all the best in the New Year!


Mr-Squidoo-Review 10 months ago

Well Done With This Review It Has Got Really Popular!!


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ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@MochRusdi: Thank you, and welcome to Squidoo.


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ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@tonyleather: Thank you Tony! Happy New Year to you and all you cherish.


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@Mr-Squidoo-Review: Thank you very much. I look forward to seeing some of your reviews.


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@anonymous: Thank you so much, Ailyn. I hope you enjoy a whole wheat pie crust as much as we do at our house.


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ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@Dressage Husband: Thank you so much Stephen. Always a pleasure to get a note from you.


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@Diana Wenzel: Thank you. It was an amazing day, all right! Still catching up. Best wishes to you for a wonderful year as well.


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@mommyplus3kids: You are welcome. I hope it goes well, and if you have any problems, do give me a shout. I want this tutorial to make it easy to learn to make whole wheat pie crusts.


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ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@jannbabes: Thank you for stopping by, and welcome to Squidoo!


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ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@Nancy Hardin: Thank you, Nancy. What a huge surprise that was yesterday morning. Adding the photos in the new how-to lens format is easy. The option is available in the step-by-step instructions tab. You get one photo slot for each step.


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@captainj88: You know, our grandmothers used to bake pies almost every day during the summer when berries and stone fruits were ripe. They could do it blindfolded. Keep making pies, and after awhile you will discover that the crusts are as easy as the filling. It just takes practice. I'm here to help if you have any questions.


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@Merrci: Thank you, Merrci. It is always such a pleasure to find your smiling face on my pages. Let me know how it goes, won't you?


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@Heidi Vincent: So glad you will give whole wheat pies a try. I do hope you will let me know how it works for you. I'd be happy to answer any questions you might have. Happy New Year!


DebMartin profile image

DebMartin 10 months ago Level 2 Commenter

Okay. I'll give whole wheat crust one more try. Thanks for the tips.


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@GrammieOlivia: I understand completely. So glad you have someone in your home who likes to bake pies!


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@MariannesWhims: You're welcome. Thank you for stopping by.


ZaraColly 10 months ago

Sounds yummy


delia-delia profile image

delia-delia 10 months ago Level 4 Commenter

Congratulations on LOTD! Thanks for sharing this crust recipe...nicely done lens.


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@smine27: I'd love to hear how your pie turned out and whether you found the page helpful. I'd be especially grateful if you found anything missing or unclear in the tutorial. Unfortunately, I have no close friends on which to test it. They're all such good piemakers already!


captainj88 profile image

captainj88 10 months ago from East Berlin, PA, USA Level 3 Commenter

Came back to congratulate you on your LOTD honors. Great job!


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@Pam Irie: You're welcome. Thank you for your kind words.


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 10 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@shadowfast7: Thank you.


anonymous 10 months ago

Don't know if I'm the guy to make this recipe but it does look like it has all kinds of potential. Congratulations on getting LotD!


seahorse60 10 months ago

Thanks for your detailed instructions! We had almost given up on trying to make flaky whole wheat pastry as ours turns out hard and heavy, but you've inspired us to try again, thanks!


Mickie Gee profile image

Mickie Gee 10 months ago Level 3 Commenter

Learning how to make my own pie crust has always been a goal of mine. Thank you for this delicious looking recipe that uses whole wheat! I will see if I can use my food processor. If not, I will be buying a pastry blender soon.


Zeraton 10 months ago

looks good to me =)


esmonaco profile image

esmonaco 10 months ago from Lakewood New York Level 7 Commenter

Very informative step-by-step, I like whole wheat anything, so I'll give this a try. Your picture looks delicious!! Thanks


Lee Hansen profile image

Lee Hansen 10 months ago from Vermont Level 3 Commenter

I need to get a pastry cutter. I gave up on making pie crust from scratch years ago because I could not get it right (as your story also reveals). With you excellent instructions and this recipe for a whole wheat crust I'm encouraged to try again. Thanks for a great inspiration and tutorial,


sybil watson 10 months ago

This crust looks so delicious - and your step-by-step instructions are fabulous. Congratulations on your LOTD!


Sable 10 months ago

Your words make me believe that you really do enjoy doing this. I love how you talk about the flour and butter fussion, and how you break it down into small, specific steps with all of the accompanying pictures. A beginner might have to experiment a few time before getting the right mix of ingredients and action before getting just the right dough, but now I can see how easy it might be. Thanks for a great write up! And congrats on another Lens of the Day!


Art Inspired profile image

Art Inspired 10 months ago

Congrats on your lens of the day!

Thanks for the wonderful step by step instructions and valuable tips.

Make it a great day!


blessedmomto7 profile image

blessedmomto7 10 months ago

Very complete steps, thanks. I will have to try this. I've been making whole wheat pizza crusts, but have never made a whole wheat pie crust.


Susan Zutautas profile image

Susan Zutautas 10 months ago from Ontario, Canada Level 5 Commenter

Your step by step instructions are perfect and look like they're easy to follow. I've never been much of a pastry maker but I'll have to give it another go with your help. Congrats on your LOTD!


Merrci profile image

Merrci 10 months ago from Oregon's Southern Coast Level 7 Commenter

Congrats on LotD Graceonline! Well deserved. This is one of the recipes I've saved to try--hopefully this month. Love the detail and the great photos. Great job!


MochRusdi 10 months ago

what a delicious wheat pie.


tonyleather 10 months ago

Great instructional lens! Well done!


Mr-Squidoo-Review 10 months ago

Looks Delicious! Well Done!


anonymous 10 months ago

I have to try this.. congrats on llotd


Dressage Husband profile image

Dressage Husband 10 months ago from Pine Grove, Nova Scotia, Canada Level 5 Commenter

I do not often make pies, but when I do i prefer a whole wheat pastry. I will bookmark so that I can return and try it when I next need some. Well done on the LOTD!


Diana Wenzel profile image

Diana Wenzel 10 months ago from Colorado Level 6 Commenter

Stopping back by to congratulate you on LotD! Happy New Year!


mommyplus3kids profile image

mommyplus3kids 10 months ago

Thanks for sharing this great recipe. It's not only delicious is also healthy. Just printed out to give it a try.


jannbabes 10 months ago

Think it taste good. try this recipe if its yum yum for my kiddo...


Nancy Hardin profile image

Nancy Hardin 10 months ago from Las Vegas, NV Level 7 Commenter

Congratulations on LOTD on Friday, 1/03/2014... Very well done instructions on this recipe. I don't even know how to add all these photos to this type of lens...and you did it beautifully.


shadowfast7 profile image

shadowfast7 10 months ago

good read!


Pam Irie profile image

Pam Irie 11 months ago from Land of Aloha Level 3 Commenter

What a fabulous tutorial!!! Thank you so much!


captainj88 profile image

captainj88 11 months ago from East Berlin, PA, USA Level 3 Commenter

Thanks for the instructions and images. I love baking pies so much, but crusts are always a bit tricky for me.


Merrci profile image

Merrci 11 months ago from Oregon's Southern Coast Level 7 Commenter

Wow, what a great, detailed lens! I would love to make good pie crusts and a wheat one would be even better. Thanks for the instructions with the great photos too. I'll try this for sure! Well done!


Heidi Vincent profile image

Heidi Vincent 11 months ago from GRENADA Level 6 Commenter

I liked this is very detailed recipe and the reasoning and suggestions given at certain points. I will definitely be trying this wholewheat recipe since it is indeed hard to find good wholewheat pastry recipes. thanks for sharing, Graceonline!


GrammieOlivia profile image

GrammieOlivia 11 months ago from Toronto Level 6 Commenter

Looks really good, but I'm still not a great pie maker, I will leave that to my sweetling, he does it far better than I could ever hope to!


MariannesWhims profile image

MariannesWhims 11 months ago from Pacific NW, USA Level 2 Commenter

Looks very professional. Thanks for the detailed instructions.


smine27 profile image

smine27 11 months ago from Tokyo, Japan Level 6 Commenter

I'm going to make a pie today and was just looking for a whole wheat pie crust. Wish me luck!


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 11 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@Margaret Schindel: Thank you, Margaret. If you're new to working with whole wheat, I hope this shows a new trick or two. If not, I hope you'll let me know if I missed a trick you employ.


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 11 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@Adventuretravels: It was wonderful to return to my computer today and find your smiling face on this page. Thank you so much for stopping by. I realize I put in a lot of detail. Think of it as Whole Wheat Pie Crust 101.

When I wrote this page, I had in mind my young-bride-self, struggling with cookbooks that assumed I knew a lot more than I did about the science and mechanics of baking.

What I really needed was my great-grandmother at my side, showing me how she worked seeming miracles with rustic whole wheat she ground herself every morning.


Adventuretravels profile image

Adventuretravels 11 months ago from London UK Level 7 Commenter

It looks a bit complicated but I'm sure it's really tasty because wholewheat pastry can be a bit heavy. I'll bookmark this and have a go later on in the new year. Happy New Year.


Margaret Schindel profile image

Margaret Schindel 11 months ago from Massachusetts Level 6 Commenter

Wonderful lesson! I'm really looking forward to making it. :)


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 11 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@Diana Wenzel: Me either! Thank you so much for being one of the first to visit this brand new page.


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 11 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@Craftymarie: I understand completely. For years I felt that way. Now it's a kind of meditation for me, but I don't expect every one to feel the same. Thank you so much for taking the time to read it and comment.


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 11 months ago from San Francisco Hub Author

@Brite-Ideas: I know. I kept wanting to jump up and make a new pie as I wrote this. Thanks for reading my page.


Brite-Ideas profile image

Brite-Ideas 11 months ago from Toronto, Canada Level 7 Commenter

fantastic lesson here, thank you! you actually make me want to go and bake right now :)


Craftymarie profile image

Craftymarie 11 months ago Level 4 Commenter

Excellent how to with all those really clear photos. I'm afraid that pastry is one thing I gave up on making because I did not enjoy making it. Your whole wheat crust looks so very tempting though.


Diana Wenzel profile image

Diana Wenzel 11 months ago from Colorado Level 6 Commenter

The instructions and photos are just as alive as the wheat crust itself. Appreciate such a detailed "how to." Loved what you shared about the flow that enters a joyful baker. Try to buy that in a grocery store! I've never seen it on the shelf in any aisle.

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